Inspiration

Nightwish & A Pale Blue Dot

One of my favorite bands Nightwish has had a huge influence on my art and who I am as a person in general. Many of their songs have strong nature themes and quotes from many astrologers and philosophers that I really loved and then looked up and read much more by those authors about life and the universe. One novel I was introduced to from Nightwish was Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space, by Carl Sagan whose ideologies became very central to my work.

“Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines..."

Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there - on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot.

Our posturing, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known.

Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space

Pale Blue Dot Cover Image

Nature

One of my biggest inspirations with this piece is nature. There is something so peaceful and empowering when standing by the ocean, hiking through a vast forest with trees that touch the sky, watching earth’s beautiful and unique creatures live and thrive. Ever since I was little, I have loved and appreciated nature and wish to share its beauty with the world, so more people can cherish it the way it deserves.

Anton Atanasov ImagePhoto by: Anton Atanasov
Sheena Wood ImagePhoto by: Sheena Wood

Space

My childhood was blessed to be filled with the magic and light from our stars, the beauty and wonder of space. Star gazing, watching meteor showers, wishing on every shooting star. Seeing the Milky Way is one of the most magical experiences I ever had. The sad truth is that my experience with the stars is a rare one. Most people alive now have never experienced seeing the Milky Way. Even where I live in a small city now the sky is usually a yellow color with only a few stars showing here or there. The facts are that about 83% of the world’s population and more than 99% of the U.S. and European populations live under light-polluted skies… Due to light pollution, the Milky Way is not visible to more than one-third of humanity, including 60% of Europeans and nearly 80% of North Americans. Light pollution has been continuously increasing. Without change light pollution will only continue to increase until the stars are completely hidden from our skies. It is sad to think that future generations will only know starless light polluted skies.

We lose something essential; we lose a part of ourselves when we lose access to the night sky. We lose that sense of stillness and awe that should be right over our heads every night Amanda Gormley from International Dark Sky

Neri Oxman and Olafur Eliasson

Neri Oxman, an American–Israeli designer and professor at the MIT and Olafur Eliasson are two artists who really inspire me as they address very important topics and issues in regard to the planet through their work. It awed me that not only were they creating art that was aesthetically pleasing but it also held a deep meaning that confronted people about important environmental issues in our lives. I wanted to use this opportunity to do this and make a large piece and statement about an important environmental issue that we are currently facing. I wanted something specific and less well known so I could hopefully introduce the issue to people and hopefully make a larger impact. So, I started looking for different topics and issues to focus on. I came across light pollution and its effects on the baby sea turtles, and my heart and mind was set.

Pixabay Stock Photo ImagePhoto by: Pixabay Stock Photo
Icewatch by Olafur Eliasson Olafur Eliasson Portrait Structure 1 by Neri Oxman Neri Oxman portrait by Noah Kalina